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Investing in social outcomes development impact bonds

With 189 member countries, staff from more 170 countries, and offices in over 130 locations, the World Bank Group is a unique global partnership: five institutions working for sustainable solutions that reduce poverty and build shared prosperity in developing countries. The World Bank Group works in every major area of development. We provide a wide array of financial products and technical assistance, and we help countries share and apply innovative knowledge and solutions to the challenges they investing in social outcomes development impact bonds. We face big challenges to help the world’s poorest people and ensure that everyone sees benefits from economic growth.

Data and research help us understand these challenges and set priorities, share knowledge of what works, and measure progress. Technological progress, new trends in global trade and investment, shifting demographics, and various other forces are all impacting what constitutes work. They are also impacting how and where it takes place. Read how the WDR 2019 will explore these trends. This World Development Report 2018 is the first ever devoted entirely to education. This WDR 2017 addresses these fundamental questions: Why are carefully designed, sensible policies too often not adopted or implemented?

When they are, why do they often fail to generate development outcomes such as security, growth, and equity? And why do some bad policies endure? The World Development Report 2016 on Digital Dividends assembles the best available evidence on the Internnet potential impact on economic growth, on equity, and on the efficiency of public service provision. The report analyzes what factors have allowed some governments, firms and households to benefit from the Internet, and identify the barriers that limit gains elsewhere. The World Development Report 2015 shows how a richer view of human behavior can help achieve development. It shows how a more subtle view of human behavior provides new tools for interventions. The 2014 World Development Report examines how improving risk management can lead to larger gains in development and poverty reduction.

It argues that improving risk management is crucial to reduce the negative impacts of shocks and hazards, but also to enable people to pursue new opportunities for growth. The 2013 World Development Report on Jobs helps explain and analyze the connection between jobs and important dimensions of economic and social development. It provides analytical tools to identify the obstacles to sustained job creation and examine differences in the nature of jobs. The 2012 World Development Report on Gender Equality and Development finds that women’s lives around the world have improved dramatically, but gaps remain in many areas. The authors use a conceptual framework to examine progress to date, and then recommend policy actions. Conflict causes human misery, destroys communities and infrastructure, and can cripple economic prospects. The goal of this World Development Report is to contribute concrete, practical suggestions to the debate on how to address and overcome violent conflict and fragility.

The main message of the report is that a “climate-smart” world is possible if we act now, act together, and act differently. In the 21st century, agriculture continues to be a fundamental instrument for sustainable development and poverty reduction. WDR 2008 concludes that agriculture alone will not be enough to massively reduce poverty, but it is an essential component of effective development strategies for most developing countries. Developing countries which invest in better education, healthcare, and job training for their record numbers of young people between the ages of 12 and 24 years of age, could produce surging economic growth and sharply reduced poverty, according to this report.

Inequality of opportunity, both within and among nations, sustains extreme deprivation, results in wasted human potential and often weakens prospects for overall prosperity and economic growth, concludes this report. Accelerating growth and poverty reduction requires governments to reduce the policy risks, costs, and barriers to competition facing firms of all types – from farmers and micro-entrepreneurs to local manufacturing companies and multinationals – concludes this report. Without better policies and institutions, social and environmental strains may derail development progress, leading to higher poverty levels and a decline in the quality of life for everybody, according to this report. This report focuses on the dimensions of poverty, and how to create a better world, free of poverty.

The analysis explores the nature, and evolution of poverty, and its causes, to present a framework for action. This report notes that localization–the growing economic and political power of cities, provinces, and other sub-national entities–will be one of the most important new trends in the 21st century. This report analyzes the risks and opportunities that the global information revolution is creating for developing countries, and concludes that access to financial, technical, and medical knowledge is crucial to improving the health and living standards of the poor. The World Bank Group, All Rights Reserved. You have clicked on a link to a page that is not part of the beta version of the new worldbank. Before you leave, we’d love to get your feedback on your experience while you were here. Thank you for agreeing to provide feedback on the new version of worldbank.

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Your feedback is very helpful to us as we work to improve the site functionality on worldbank. With 189 member countries, staff from more 170 countries, and offices in over 130 locations, the World Bank Group is a unique global partnership: five institutions working for sustainable solutions that reduce poverty and build shared prosperity in developing countries. The World Bank Group works in every major area of development. We provide a wide array of financial products and technical assistance, and we help countries share and apply innovative knowledge and solutions to the challenges they face. We face big challenges to help the world’s poorest people and ensure that everyone sees benefits from economic growth. Data and research help us understand these challenges and set priorities, share knowledge of what works, and measure progress.

Working with governments, communities, civil society, the private sector, and the marginalized, including persons with disabilities and Indigenous Peoples, Social Development translates the complex relationship between societies and states into operations. Empirical evidence and operational experience show that Social Development promotes economic growth and leads to better interventions and a higher quality of life. The safeguards review included the most extensive consultation ever conducted by the World Bank Group. It concluded nearly four years of analysis and engagement around the world with governments, development experts, and civil society groups, reaching nearly 8,000 stakeholders in 63 countries. The ESF is part of a far-reaching effort by the World Bank Group to improve development outcomes and streamline its work. The World Bank has begun an intensive preparation and training period to pave the way for the implementation of the new Framework which is expected to go into effect in early 2018, once all the elements are in place for the launch.

The Azerbaijan Second Rural Investment Project supports the rehabilitation of critical infrastructure and financing of livelihood activities, with over 1,200 sub-projects and six livelihood pilot initiatives completed as of March 2016. In Egypt, the Cairo Airport Terminal 2 Rehabilitation Project supported the review of the airport’s design and costs to improve accessibility measures, making the new airport disability friendly. In Iraq, the Emergency Disabilities Project supported the delivery of improved rehabilitation and prosthetic services for people with disabilities. 1,900 sub-projects to improve access to infrastructure, sanitation, and dietary intake.